Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans and World War II
Feb
17
Feb 17

Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans and World War II

  • National Museum of American History

Exhibit Dates: February 17, 2017 – February 19, 2018
After Japan attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, and the United States entered a war in Europe and the Pacific, the nation was overcome by shock, anger, and fear—a fear exaggerated by long-standing anti-Asian prejudice. Ten weeks later President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, under which nearly 75,000 American citizens of Japanese ancestry were taken into custody. Another 45,000 Japanese nationals living in the United States (but long denied citizenship because of their race) were also incarcerated. Some forty years later, members of the Japanese American community led the nation to confront the wrong it had done—and to make it right.

Executive Order 9066
Feb
17
Feb 19

Executive Order 9066

  • National Museum of American History

Exhibit Dates: February 17, 2017 – February 19, 2018
February 19, 2017, is the 75th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066. This three-page document signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt changed the course of history for a segment of Americans of Japanese ancestry in America, and challenged the constitutional rights of these Americans. The National Museum of American History will commemorate the event through an exhibition marking its anniversary.

EXCLUSION: The Presidio's Role in World War II Japanese American Incarceration
Apr
1
Mar 1

EXCLUSION: The Presidio's Role in World War II Japanese American Incarceration

  • Presidio Officers’ Club, Presidio’s Main Post

Exhibit Dates: April 2017 - March 2018
This is a free, year-long special exhibition held in the historic Presidio Officers’ Club. EXCLUSION: The Presidio’s Role in World War II Japanese American Incarceration describes the pivotal role that the Presidio played in the forced removal and incarceration of 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. This is the fourth special exhibition to be held at the Presidio Officers’ Club. These annual exhibitions explore how and why the past matters and inspire civic engagement by fostering an understanding of the ways the Presidio’s heritage is relevant today.

"A Loaded Weapon: Photographic Perspectives on the Japanese American Internment Camps of World War II" exhibit at the Robert H. Jackson Center
Jun
13
Aug 31

"A Loaded Weapon: Photographic Perspectives on the Japanese American Internment Camps of World War II" exhibit at the Robert H. Jackson Center

  • Robert H. Jackson Center

The exhibit examines the experience of the 120,000 Japanese Americans detained in 10 internment camps across the U.S. following the bombing of Pearl Harbor. It also features the story of Fred Korematsu, a Japanese American who refused to comply with the detainment order, who was eventually arrested and interned. His detainment was upheld by the Supreme Court. Justice Jackson was one of three dissenters.

"And Then They Came For Us" film screening
Jun
26
6:00 pm18:00

"And Then They Came For Us" film screening

As we commemorate the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066 which was signed by President Roosevelt on Feb. 19, 1942, the film documents through the use of photos taken by Dorothea Lange and others, the damage this order did to 120,000 people, two thirds of whom were American citizens.

California Historical Society Presentation with "Fred Korematsu Speaks Up" Authors & George Omi
Jun
29
6:00 pm18:00

California Historical Society Presentation with "Fred Korematsu Speaks Up" Authors & George Omi

  • California Historical Society

Fred Korematsu was a 23-year-old welder living in Oakland when the U.S. government forced Japanese Americans from their homes into desolate camps. Korematsu defied the order, and his legal challenge resulted in an infamous Supreme Court decision. Laura Atkins and Stan Yogi, co-authors of “Fred Korematsu Speaks Up,” a new biography for young readers, will discuss the civil rights hero’s life, its relevance today, and their work to share his story with students. They will be joined by Karen Korematsu, Executive Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute, who will explain the Institute’s efforts to connect Korematsu’s story with current discrimination against Muslims.