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Enduring Conviction: Fred Korematsu And His Quest For Justice

  • 555 Post Street San Francisco, CA, 94102 United States

Lorraine Bannai, Professor of Lawyering Skills and Director, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality, Seattle University School of Law; Author, Enduring Conviction: Fred Korematsu and His Quest for Justice.

The vulnerability of minority communities has always been a big problem, but it is particularly so when fear exacerbates ignorance. Not long ago, it was Japanese Americans; now it is Muslims. Professor Bannai illuminates this theme through the story of Fred Korematsu, a 22-year-old Oakland welder who refused to comply with orders that led to the incarceration of more than 110,000 people of Japanese ancestry during World War II. In Korematsu v. United States­, the wartime Supreme Court rejected his challenge to the government in one of its most infamous cases. More than 40 years later, Professor Bannai was part of the legal team that successfully challenged Korematsu's conviction based on proof that the government had falsified the record.

For Korematsu’s courage and for his work warning of the dangers of prejudice, President Clinton awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1998.

Location: 555 Post St., San Francisco
Time: 5:30 p.m. check-in, 6 p.m. program, 7 p.m. book signing
MLF: Humanities
Program organizer: George Hammond
Notes: Part of our special August series Big Solutions to Big Problems, generously sponsored by Ernst & Young

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