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Minidoka Civil Liberties Symposium
Oct
15
Oct 16

Minidoka Civil Liberties Symposium

  • Boise State University

The Minidoka Civil Liberties Symposium, named for the camp not far from Jerome where thousands of Japanese Americans were held following Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, takes on the theme of mass incarceration in America.

Karen Korematsu will speak on her father’s incarceration and Black Lives Matter.

Beyond The Textbook: Stories Of Japanese American Incarceration
Oct
2
2:00 pm14:00

Beyond The Textbook: Stories Of Japanese American Incarceration

  • Peninsula Museum of Art

Three Japanese American women: Delphine Hirasun - author and curator of Art of Gaman, Judy Shintan - artist exhibiting at PMA, and Jill Guillermo-Togaw - dancer and choreographer, discuss how they keep this history alive using different modalities and intimate stories of the internees. Grace Morizawa, author and educator, will moderate.

Midori Kai Arts & Crafts Boutique
Sep
10
9:00 am09:00

Midori Kai Arts & Crafts Boutique

  • Mountain View Buddhist Temple

Thank you Midori Kai for your generous Grant!

As a non-profit corporation, Midori Kai, Inc. reserves 100% of the profits from the boutique for awards to non-profit recipients, and each year, at our boutique, our generous vendors contribute 10% of their gross sales to Midori Kai, Inc. A portion of the boutique proceeds are donated to selected non-profit organizations for a two-year period.

Enduring Conviction: Fred Korematsu And His Quest For Justice
Aug
10
6:00 pm18:00

Enduring Conviction: Fred Korematsu And His Quest For Justice

  • 555 Post Street San Francisco, CA, 94102 United States

The vulnerability of minority communities has always been a big problem, but it is particularly so when fear exacerbates ignorance. Not long ago, it was Japanese Americans; now it is Muslims. Professor Bannai illuminates this theme through the story of Fred Korematsu, a 22-year-old Oakland welder who refused to comply with orders that led to the incarceration of more than 110,000 people of Japanese ancestry during World War II. In Korematsu v. United States­, the wartime Supreme Court rejected his challenge to the government in one of its most infamous cases. More than 40 years later, Professor Bannai was part of the legal team that successfully challenged Korematsu's conviction based on proof that the government had falsified the record.

Author Talk & Book Signing
Aug
6
11:00 am11:00

Author Talk & Book Signing

  • 555 Post Street San Francisco, CA, 94102 United States

The vulnerability of minority communities has always been a big problem, but it is particularly so when fear exacerbates ignorance. Not long ago, it was Japanese Americans; now it is Muslims. Professor Bannai illuminates this theme through the story of Fred Korematsu, a 22-year-old Oakland welder who refused to comply with orders that led to the incarceration of more than 110,000 people of Japanese ancestry during World War II. In Korematsu v. United States­, the wartime Supreme Court rejected his challenge to the government in one of its most infamous cases. More than 40 years later, Professor Bannai was part of the legal team that successfully challenged Korematsu's conviction based on proof that the government had falsified the record.

Race and Internment: Lessons for Our Frayed Political System Thursday, August
Aug
4
12:30 pm12:30

Race and Internment: Lessons for Our Frayed Political System Thursday, August

  • Farella Braun & Martell LLP, Russ Building

Join us for an afternoon of programs focused on immigration in times of national danger.

Learn first how our Japanese-American immigrant community strongly aided the war effort. Then, join our panel discussion on the wartime persecution of that community and the lessons our legal systems can learn from that experience. A free reception follows.

Day Of Remembrance 2016: What Does Citizenship Look Like In The 21st Century?
Feb
25
4:30 pm16:30

Day Of Remembrance 2016: What Does Citizenship Look Like In The 21st Century?

  • Xavier Auditorium at Fromm

How do social institutions, xenophobia, and racism shape understandings of belonging and consequences for members of different communities? This interactive roundtable discussion brings together different leaders in social justice and civil rights advocacy to discuss with the USF & Bay Area community what U.S. citizenship looks like in the 21st century.

6th Annual Fred Korematsu Day Celebration
Jan
30
7:30 pm19:30

6th Annual Fred Korematsu Day Celebration

  • Herbst Theater

Featured Panel

Moderator: John Diaz, Editorial Page Editor, San Francisco Chronicle

Grande H. Lum, Director Community Relations Service, U.S. Department of Justice

Farhana Khera, President & Executive Director, Muslim Advocates

Lorraine Bannai, Professor, Seattle University School of Law; Director, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

Special Guest Speaker
The Honorable Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar,  California Supreme Court Justice

Master of Ceremonies: John Sasaki, KTVU Fox 2

A Presentation by Karen Korematsu
Jan
30
12:30 pm12:30

A Presentation by Karen Korematsu

  • JA Museum of San Jose

The California Legacy Voices Teacher Workshop will celebrate Fred T. Korematsu Day on Saturday, January 30, 2016, 10:00 am to 2:00 pm at JAMSJ.  A presentation by Karen Korematsu, daughter of Fred T. Korematsu and a short film about Mr. Korematsu will be 12:30 - 2:00.  Beginning from 2:00 to 4:00 a panel of judges and community leaders will discuss the relevance of the Fred T. Korematsu coram nobis case of 1983 with regard to intolerance and prejudice towards ethnic and religious minorities today.  Karen Korematsu’s talk and the panel discussion are open to anyone in the general public.

“Stand Up For What Is Right”: Celebrate the first annual “Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties and the Constitution,” established by the Virginia state legislature
Jan
29
5:00 pm17:00

“Stand Up For What Is Right”: Celebrate the first annual “Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties and the Constitution,” established by the Virginia state legislature

  • McGuireWoods LLP

Last February, the Virginia General Assembly passed a resolution designating January 30th of 2016 and in each succeeding year as the "Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties and the Constitution in Virginia," in honor of the courageous young man who stood up against the federal government which imprisoned 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II.

Fred Korematsu Day Celebration
Jan
26
2:30 pm14:30

Fred Korematsu Day Celebration

  • San Jose State University

KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Jose Antonio Vargas - Pulitzer Prize Journalist "Documented" Film Documentary, Writer& Director; Founder, "Define American"

Special Guest 
Congressman Mike Honda - 17th Congressional District

EMCEE 
Lloyd LaCuesta - Retired Broadcast Journalist; Adjunct Journalism Professor, San Jose State University

Undaunted Courage & Civil Liberties
Jan
15
5:30 pm17:30

Undaunted Courage & Civil Liberties

  • Aliiolani Hale

The Aliiolani Hale—King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center of Hawaii and the Hawai'i State Bar Association Civic Education Committee present Undaunted Courage & Civil Liberties in recognition of Civil Liberties and the Constitution Day

Fred Korematsu Day Heroes Celebration
Jan
27
1:00 pm13:00

Fred Korematsu Day Heroes Celebration

VIP Reception with honorees 1:00 pm
Program 2:30 pm
Event emcee: Danny Glover


Fred Korematsu Day Heroes Celebration honorees:

Fred Korematsu, Grace Lee Boggs, 1938 Chinatown Dollar Store Strikers, Mitsuye Endo, Gordon Hirabayashi, Internment Dissenters (No-Nos, Draft Resisters, & Renunciants), Larry Itliong, Japanese American WWII Veterans, Yuri Kochiyama, Queen Lili’uokalani, Mamie Tape, Bhagat Singh Thind, Philip Vera Cruz, Veteranos, Wong Kim Ark. and Minoru Yasu

Fred Korematsu Day 2011 Inaugural Celebration
Jan
30
Jan 31

Fred Korematsu Day 2011 Inaugural Celebration

  • Wheeler auditorium UC Berkeley Campus

A keynote speech by the Reverend Jesse Jackson. The founder and president of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition, Rev. Jackson is one of America’s foremost civil rights, religious and political figures. Over the past forty years, he has played a pivotal role in virtually every movement for empowerment, peace, civil rights, gender equality, and economic and social justice. In 2000, President Bill Clinton awarded Reverend Jackson the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. Rev. Jackson has been called the “Conscience of the Nation” and “the Great Unifier,” challenging America to be inclusive and to establish just and humane priorities for the benefit of all. He is known for bringing people together on common ground across lines of race, culture, class, gender and belief. In 1999, Fred Korematsu was honored at the Rainbow PUSH Coalition’s annual awards dinner.