Philly.com: Philly Garden to Honor Man Who Challenged Internment of Japanese Americans

Philly.com: Philly Garden to Honor Man Who Challenged Internment of Japanese Americans

A feeling of "peace and serenity" enveloped 6-year-old Kenneth Finkel that day in 1958 as he walked the grounds of the Shofuso Japanese House and Garden with his father, whose thoughts likely were more complicated, he recalls.

Sen. Coons Speaks about Korematsu Legacy and Mistakes and Lessons of Japanese American Incarceration

Sen. Coons Speaks about Korematsu Legacy and Mistakes and Lessons of Japanese American Incarceration

On June 28, 2016, the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Oversight, Agency Action, Federal Rights and Federal Courts held a hearing on “Willful Blindness – The Consequences of Agency Efforts to DeEmphasize Radical Islam in Combating Terrorism.” Senator Christopher Coons of Delaware spoke about how measures to protect national security must not violate constitutional rights and fundamental American values. Sen. Coons shared how the wrongs of the Japanese American incarceration and Fred Korematsu’s fight, including his legacy as carried on by Karen Korematsu, remind us of the path America cannot take again. See Sen. Coons’ closing remarks by clicking the image above.

“A MAN OF QUIET BRAVERY”

“A MAN OF QUIET BRAVERY”

APABA-DC's presentation of the Fred Korematsu v. United States case - "A Man of Quiet Bravery" was a success last night!  Esteemed judges and leaders of our the legal and civil rights communities did an outstanding job re-enacting the case at the beautiful ceremonial courtroom of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.  At the reception following the re-enactment, Ms. Karen Korematsu, Fred's daughter and Executive Director of the Korematsu Institute, provided moving remarks.  APABA-DC is proud to have had the opportunity to highlight this important case that should always be remembered and that serves as a reminder to us all of the mistakes of our history that should never be repeated.

Contra Costa Times: El Cerrito ceremony commemorates Korematsu Day, dedicates new school campus

Contra Costa Times: El Cerrito ceremony commemorates Korematsu Day, dedicates new school campus

A dual ceremony was held Jan. 30 honoring the late civil rights activist Fred T. Korematsu and dedicating the new middle school campus in El Cerrito named in his honor. Korematsu, in 1942 at the age of 23, refused to be placed in the government's Japanese American internment camps of World War II. He was arrested and convicted for defying the order. After a failed Supreme Court appeal in 1944, a federal court in San Francisco overturned his conviction on November 10, 1983. Korematsu was awarded The Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton in 1998.

Fred Korematsu Day Honors Civil Rights Leader

Fred Korematsu Day Honors Civil Rights Leader

SAN FRANCISCO--On Saturday, the Fred T. Korematsu Institute honored the late Fred T. Korematsu, with the 6th Annual Fred Korematsu Day celebration at the Herbst Theatre. Korematsu famously fought against the incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII, and this year's celebration, titled "Re(ad)dressing Racial Injustice: From Japanese American Incarceration to Anti-Muslim Bigotry," built upon Korematsu's legacy by connecting the Japanese American WWII experience to urgent issues facing other communities, particularly American Muslims.

The Davis Enterprise: Students Celebrate Korematsu Day with Songs

The Davis Enterprise: Students Celebrate Korematsu Day with Songs

Students at Fred T. Korematsu Elementary School in Davis celebrated the birthday of their school’s namesake with an assembly Friday that honored Korematsu’s long, and sometimes lonely, legal effort to challenge the federal government’s World War II order that relocated more than 100,000 Japanese-Americans in Western states to internment camps.

The Zinn Education Project: Dec. 17, 1944: U.S. Supreme Court Rules Against Fred Korematsu and Declares Denial of Civil Liberties Legal

The Zinn Education Project: Dec. 17, 1944: U.S. Supreme Court Rules Against Fred Korematsu and Declares Denial of Civil Liberties Legal

On Dec. 17, 1944, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Korematsu v. United States that the denial of civil liberties based on race and national origin was legal. Fred Korematsu (Jan. 30, 1919–Mar. 30, 2005), a U.S. citizen and the son of Japanese immigrants, had refused to evacuate when President Roosevelt ordered the internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII. Korematsu was arrested, convicted, and sent to the Topaz Internment Camp in Utah.

Virginia State Legislature Establishes Korematsu Day

The Senate of Virginia unanimously adopted House Joint Resolution 641 this week to designate Jan. 30 of each year, beginning in 2016, as “Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties and the Constitution in Virginia.”

Fred Korematsu Day in Georgia

The Georgia Asian American & Pacific Islander (AAPI) Task Force will commemorate Fred Korematsu Day together with its 2014 AAPI Legislative Day at the State Capitol on January 30, 2014, from 9:30 am – 2 pm.

Fred Korematsu Day — Utah

On January 18, 2013, Utah Governor Gary Herbert proclaimed “Fred Korematsu Day” in Utah for January 30, 2013, which would have been Mr. Korematsu’s 94th birthday. With this proclamation, the beehive state became the third in the country to recognize Fred Korematsu Day, following California’s 2010 passage of a bill establishing a permanent “Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties and the Constitution,” celebrated every January 30, and Hawaii’s May 2012 gubernatorial proclamation recognizing January 30, 2013 as Fred Korematsu Day in Hawaii.