President Franklin Roosevelt

The Charlotte Observer: Korematsu case: a ‘loaded weapon’ for discrimination

Between President Trump’s executive order barring anyone from seven majority-Muslim countries from the United States and his nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court, a milestone passed that few noticed. Fred Korematsu, who died in 2005, would have celebrated his 98th birthday. Fred Korematsu has an important connection to both of these presidential decisions, and it is one that needs to be considered by the Senate and the Court as they make their respective decisions on whether to confirm Judge Gorsuch and whether to allow the immigration ban to stand.

The Mercury News: Courts have to be able to review executive orders like Trump’s

When President Trump asserts the supremacy of his executive orders, unhampered by the power of “so-called judges” to review his actions, he disregards a foundational truth of U.S. constitutional law:  the independence of the judiciary.

San Francisco Chronicle: SF Day of Remembrance marks 75th anniversary of internment order

When Ben Takeshita and his family were sent to Japanese internment camps 75 years ago, he said civil rights organizations told them: Don’t fight. Just go quietly.

WBAA News: 75 Years Later, Americans Still Bear Scars Of Internment Order

It has been three-quarters of a century since President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. The order, issued just over two months after Japan's surprise attack at Pearl Harbor, gave the U.S. military the ability to designate areas "from which any or all persons may be excluded."

The San Diego Union-Tribune: Some hear echoes of Japanese internment in Trump's immigration plans

There is a saying, often attributed to Mark Twain, that history doesn’t repeat itself, but it rhymes.

For many Japanese-Americans, it’s rhyming now, as President Donald Trump continues to push for a halt on refugees and immigrants from predominantly Muslim countries tied to terrorism.

Los Angeles Times: 75 years later, looking back at The Times' shameful response to the Japanese internment

Seventy-five years ago today, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, declaring parts of the United States to be military zones from which particular groups of people could be “excluded” for security reasons. The order set the stage for the relocation and internment, beginning the following month, of 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry, most of whom were American citizens living on the West Coast.

Dale Minami: A Chance of a Lifetime

When our legal team stood in the courtroom of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California on a rainy Nov. 10, 1983, to argue for the overturning of Fred Korematsu’s 40-year-old conviction for failure to obey the military orders directed at Japanese Americans in 1942, we knew that an extraordinary event would be unfolding before us.