Karen Korematsu

The Stranger: Children of Japanese Americans Who Defied Internment Ask Court to Reject Trump's Travel Ban

In a brief filed in federal court, the children of three Japanese Americans who challenged the U.S. government's detention programs during World War II are asking the court to reject President Donald Trump's travel ban because it is based on the same racist ideas that led to Japanese internment.

Sen. Coons Speaks about Korematsu Legacy and Mistakes and Lessons of Japanese American Incarceration

Sen. Coons Speaks about Korematsu Legacy and Mistakes and Lessons of Japanese American Incarceration

On June 28, 2016, the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Oversight, Agency Action, Federal Rights and Federal Courts held a hearing on “Willful Blindness – The Consequences of Agency Efforts to DeEmphasize Radical Islam in Combating Terrorism.” Senator Christopher Coons of Delaware spoke about how measures to protect national security must not violate constitutional rights and fundamental American values. Sen. Coons shared how the wrongs of the Japanese American incarceration and Fred Korematsu’s fight, including his legacy as carried on by Karen Korematsu, remind us of the path America cannot take again. See Sen. Coons’ closing remarks by clicking the image above.

“A MAN OF QUIET BRAVERY”

“A MAN OF QUIET BRAVERY”

APABA-DC's presentation of the Fred Korematsu v. United States case - "A Man of Quiet Bravery" was a success last night!  Esteemed judges and leaders of our the legal and civil rights communities did an outstanding job re-enacting the case at the beautiful ceremonial courtroom of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.  At the reception following the re-enactment, Ms. Karen Korematsu, Fred's daughter and Executive Director of the Korematsu Institute, provided moving remarks.  APABA-DC is proud to have had the opportunity to highlight this important case that should always be remembered and that serves as a reminder to us all of the mistakes of our history that should never be repeated.

Contra Costa Times: El Cerrito ceremony commemorates Korematsu Day, dedicates new school campus

Contra Costa Times: El Cerrito ceremony commemorates Korematsu Day, dedicates new school campus

A dual ceremony was held Jan. 30 honoring the late civil rights activist Fred T. Korematsu and dedicating the new middle school campus in El Cerrito named in his honor. Korematsu, in 1942 at the age of 23, refused to be placed in the government's Japanese American internment camps of World War II. He was arrested and convicted for defying the order. After a failed Supreme Court appeal in 1944, a federal court in San Francisco overturned his conviction on November 10, 1983. Korematsu was awarded The Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton in 1998.

Michigan Law: MLaw's Fred Korematsu Celebration Honors Legacy of Japanese American Civil Rights Leader

Michigan Law: MLaw's Fred Korematsu Celebration Honors Legacy of Japanese American Civil Rights Leader

The 1944 Supreme Court case Korematsu v. United States—which upheld the constitutionality of interning Fred Korematsu and 120,000 other Japanese Americans during World War II on the grounds of military necessity—remains a blemish on the Court's history because of the practice's racially biased motivations. Although many believe similar actions never could be carried out today, Korematsu's daughter and others warned of the dangers of forgetting the past during the Law School's January 28 Fred Korematsu Recognition.

Fred Korematsu Day Honors Civil Rights Leader

Fred Korematsu Day Honors Civil Rights Leader

SAN FRANCISCO--On Saturday, the Fred T. Korematsu Institute honored the late Fred T. Korematsu, with the 6th Annual Fred Korematsu Day celebration at the Herbst Theatre. Korematsu famously fought against the incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII, and this year's celebration, titled "Re(ad)dressing Racial Injustice: From Japanese American Incarceration to Anti-Muslim Bigotry," built upon Korematsu's legacy by connecting the Japanese American WWII experience to urgent issues facing other communities, particularly American Muslims.

WZZM13 ABC: Fred Korematsu Honored with Michigan Holiday

ALLENDALE, Mich. (WZZM) – He was a champion for civil rights beginning in World War II. Now, he's the first Asian American recognized by a state with a day named in his honor.

Fred Korematsu Day – Hawaii

On Saturday, October 22, 2011, Mary Chun, a social studies teacher at Waialua High & Intermediate School, attended a Korematsu teacher’s workshop at Aliiolani Hale, sponsored by the Judiciary History Center, the Hawai’i State Bar Association Civic Education Committee, the William S. Richardson School of Law at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and the Hawaii Department of Education, Social Studies Program. She was particularly touched and inspired by a presentation given by Karen Korematsu, Fred’s daughter. The Saturday workshop was followed by a second component, also held at Aliiolani Hale. This component featured a video conference, broadcasts to DOE schools throughout the state, in which former acting US Solicitor General Neil Katyal spoke to a a group of students in Hawaii’s Supreme Courtroom about Korematsu v. the United States as well as Hamdan v. Rumsfeld.