Fred Korematsu Day

MinnPost: How to remember the wartime Japanese-American incarceration

Seventy-five years ago — on Feb. 19, 1942 — President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, a catalyst behind the forced removal and mass incarceration of nearly 120,000 Japanese Americans. America was at war with Japan.

The Huffington Post: Could Executive Order 9066 Happen Again?

February 19, 2017 is the 75th anniversary of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signing Executive Order 9066 , which authorised the detention not just of enemy aliens during World War II, but also American citizens. Unlike President Trump’s recent Executive Order restricting immigration and refugees, there was no popular outcry at the time, despite the fact the constitutional rights of American citizens were at risk.

The Press & Guide: Dearborn schools honor legacy of activist who fought against Japanese internment

Several groups came together Feb. 3 at Fordson High School in Dearborn to honor the civil rights legacy of Fred Korematsu, an American citizen of Japanese ancestry who was incarcerated during World War II by the U.S. government following the attacks on Pearl Harbor.

The University of Michigan Law School: Korematsu Day Commemoration Considers Internment's Parallels to Trump's Immigration Ban

As part of a nationwide commemoration of Fred Korematsu Day on January 30, the Asian Pacific American Law Student Association and Muslim Law Student Association co-sponsored a celebratory dinner and panel to honor the Japanese-American civil rights icon. Korematsu made history in bringing a lawsuit against the United States government for its internment of individuals of Japanese descent during World War II (WWII). Although the Supreme Court ruled against him in Korematsu v. United States, the case was reopened in the 1980s because of evidence of government misconduct in the original trial. In 1983, a federal court for the Northern District of California overturned Korematsu's conviction.

Nichi Bei Weekly: Korematsu Day tackles mass incarceration across communities

OAKLAND, Calif. — The Fred T. Korematsu Institute held its seventh annual Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties and the Constitution program Jan. 29 at the Paramount Theatre. The program, entitled “Mass Incarceration Across Communities: What’s Next?,” commemorated the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066.

The Pioneer: Oakland honors Fred T. Korematsu

If Google features you on their internet page logo, you must be a big deal.

The internet search engine company did just that on Monday when it honored Japanese Civil Rights activist Fred T. Korematsu on the day dedicated to him, Jan. 30.

NBC Miami: 'This is Not Right': Daughter of Civil Rights Activist Fred Korematsu on Trump Travel Ban

Google is celebrating the late Fred Toyosaburo Korematsu as its Google Doodle on Monday, paying tribute to the Oakland-born civil rights activist who refused to go to the government’s incarceration camps for Japanese Americans.

Nichibei Weekly: Re(ad)dressing Injustice: Korematsu Day connects JA incarceration to anti-Muslim bigotry

Nichibei Weekly: Re(ad)dressing Injustice: Korematsu Day connects JA incarceration to anti-Muslim bigotry

In San Francisco’s Herbst Theatre, the Fred T. Korematsu Institute presented its annual program for Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties and the Constitution Jan. 30 with this year’s program entitled “Re(ad)dressing Racial Injustice: From Japanese American Incarceration to Anti-Muslim Bigotry.” Featuring two panels of speakers, as well as presentations by children, the evening addressed the parallels Muslims and people of Arabic descent face today with that of wartime incarceration of Japanese Americans.

Michigan Law: MLaw's Fred Korematsu Celebration Honors Legacy of Japanese American Civil Rights Leader

Michigan Law: MLaw's Fred Korematsu Celebration Honors Legacy of Japanese American Civil Rights Leader

The 1944 Supreme Court case Korematsu v. United States—which upheld the constitutionality of interning Fred Korematsu and 120,000 other Japanese Americans during World War II on the grounds of military necessity—remains a blemish on the Court's history because of the practice's racially biased motivations. Although many believe similar actions never could be carried out today, Korematsu's daughter and others warned of the dangers of forgetting the past during the Law School's January 28 Fred Korematsu Recognition.