Fred Korematsu

The Stranger: Children of Japanese Americans Who Defied Internment Ask Court to Reject Trump's Travel Ban

In a brief filed in federal court, the children of three Japanese Americans who challenged the U.S. government's detention programs during World War II are asking the court to reject President Donald Trump's travel ban because it is based on the same racist ideas that led to Japanese internment.

The Washington Post: Incarceration by Executive Order

Richard Murakami was born in 1932 on a grape farm in Florin, Calif., outside of Sacramento. The farm was his grandfather’s, an immigrant from Japan. Richard was born on the farm, his mother, Yomiko, told him, because Sacramento hospitals refused to admit Japanese patients.

NBC News: Editorial: Day of Remembrance Is a Reminder to Continue to Fight Injustice

NBC News: Editorial: Day of Remembrance Is a Reminder to Continue to Fight Injustice

By Karen Korematsu

On this day in 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which gave the U.S. military the authority to incarcerate more than 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. February 19 is observed today as the Day of Remembrance.

The Davis Enterprise: Students Celebrate Korematsu Day with Songs

The Davis Enterprise: Students Celebrate Korematsu Day with Songs

Students at Fred T. Korematsu Elementary School in Davis celebrated the birthday of their school’s namesake with an assembly Friday that honored Korematsu’s long, and sometimes lonely, legal effort to challenge the federal government’s World War II order that relocated more than 100,000 Japanese-Americans in Western states to internment camps.

The Huffington Post: What Every American Should Know

We don't need to look any further than this presidential campaign season to see the fragmentation and polarization of American culture and politics. We live in an age when growing diversity, demographic flux, and social changes are pushing out the prominent American identity of the past, an identity that really only ever fit white males. Perhaps we should not be surprised by the nostalgia of so many who want to "Make America Great Again."

Dale Minami: A Chance of a Lifetime

When our legal team stood in the courtroom of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California on a rainy Nov. 10, 1983, to argue for the overturning of Fred Korematsu’s 40-year-old conviction for failure to obey the military orders directed at Japanese Americans in 1942, we knew that an extraordinary event would be unfolding before us.