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Thank you to our Leadership Sponsors

The Fred Korematsu Day celebration is an annual event
hosted by the Fred T. Korematsu Institute

Click here to view a copy of the 2016 celebration event program

Click here to view a copy of the speech presented by speech contest winner Madeeha Khan
(8th Grade, Fred T. Korematsu Middle School)

Click here to view a copy of the speech presented by speech contest winner Vivien Wallis
(7th Grade, Fred T. Korematsu Middle School)

Special guest speakers from the 6th Annual Fred Korematsu Day Celebration: Master of Ceremonies John Sasaki (KTVU Fox 2); Moderator John Diaz (Editorial Page Editor, San Francisco Chronicle); Lorraine Bannai (Professor, Seattle University School of Law and Director, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality); Karen Korematsu (Executive Director, Fred T. Korematsu Institute); The Honorable Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar (California Supreme Court Justice); Farhana Khera (President & Executive Director, Muslim Advocates); and Grande H. Lum (Director, Community Relations Service, U.S. Department of Justice).

Special guest speakers from the 6th Annual Fred Korematsu Day Celebration: Master of Ceremonies John Sasaki (KTVU Fox 2); Moderator John Diaz (Editorial Page Editor, San Francisco Chronicle); Lorraine Bannai (Professor, Seattle University School of Law and Director, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality); Karen Korematsu (Executive Director, Fred T. Korematsu Institute); The Honorable Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar (California Supreme Court Justice); Farhana Khera (President & Executive Director, Muslim Advocates); and Grande H. Lum (Director, Community Relations Service, U.S. Department of Justice).


Lori was a member of Fred's coram nobis legal team and is now Director, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality at the Seattle University School of Law. 

In "Enduring Conviction," Lori tells the story of Fred Korematsu, a 22-year-old welder in Oakland, California, who challenged military orders that culminated in the incarceration of over 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. In 1944, the Supreme Court, in one of its most infamous decisions, affirmed his conviction, accepting the government’s claim that its actions were justified by military necessity.

"A remarkable story of a man who stood up and spoke out in the same tradition of others in this country who have spoken out against oppression and discrimination...Fred Korematsu was an ordinary man who did extraordinary deeds and with that he made history." – George Takei